Rune Walls

Rune Walls are an ancient and largely forgotten tradition of the dwarven people. They are as much an art form as a means of recording and conveying information. These walls are constructed from carved and assembled rune tiles, which must be assembled into rows, often several layers deep, then a stone slab is placed over the bottom row, and a new row created, and so on.

The outermost layer is easiest to read (if one understands the ancient dwarf script, of course). The next layer is more difficult to read, because it must be viewed between the empty spaces of the outermost layer. Then there is a third layer, then a fourth, then a fifth. The third layer is nearly impossible to read just by sight, as often it requires viewing from several angles to determine what any individual rune is. After that, it’s mostly guesswork and interpretation of what might be there; more philosophy and estimation than reading.

The art of the overlaying pattern runes is an ancient one within dwarf culture. Nearly any dwarf can carve solid runes and assemble them as a wall, but only the masters of the craft can arrange them layers-deep in a manner which allows a viewer to interpret what the deepest, unseen runes might say based on the organization of runes on the layers in front of them. And individuals who master this craft often develop their own rune-carving style that might be called calligraphic, and not easily read as each rune is shaped to serve the wall as a whole rather than simple comprehension.

Rune Walls

The Mountain Throne Yuritau